Speed play pedals have seized up.

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adrian
Posts: 35
Joined: 23 Jun 2010, 11:46
Location: Earlwood, NSW

Postby adrian » 02 Feb 2016, 19:56

My speed plays have completely seized up due to not having seen a grease gun in some time...the bearings need replacing.
Can anyone recommend a repairer?
Is it a job I could do myself?

Cheers!

demerson
Posts: 42
Joined: 13 Feb 2015, 09:14

Postby demerson » 03 Feb 2016, 13:03

I regrease mine semi regularly just using a small syringe (you don't need a grease gun). It's very easy to do.

A quick google found this for taking them apart:

http://nyvelocity.com/articles/equipmen ... ark-purdy/

An you can get new bearings quite cheaply (assuming that is what has failed, i guess you won't know till you open it up...).

http://www.wiggle.com.au/speedplay-zero ... aring-set/

Will be curious as to how you go as I have a set of speedplay pedals in my trainer bike i need to service soon.

Cheers,
Dave

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adrian
Posts: 35
Joined: 23 Jun 2010, 11:46
Location: Earlwood, NSW

Postby adrian » 03 Feb 2016, 16:42

Thanks, Dave. I'll let you know how I go!
Cheers,
Adrian :D

demerson
Posts: 42
Joined: 13 Feb 2015, 09:14

Postby demerson » 04 Feb 2016, 13:09

No worries Adrian,

Just to follow up after a bit more compulsive googling I found to following (Quote taken from here incase the link dies in the future. Posted by Luc on the weightweenies forum: http://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum ... =3&t=81464)

The needle bearings on all models of Speedplay road bike pedals are NOT fused or glued in any way and are very easy to change out. Instructions below.

The only differences between the X1 and X2 are spindle material and body color. You can rebuild your X1’s with X2 bodies with NO problems. They are the exact same except for color. No need to spend $100+ to rebuild your pedals.

I have measured the internals of all of the models listed below using a micrometer and found that they are all identical and cross-compatible. The bodies, cleats and bowties are different, but inside they are all the same.

X1 & X2.
Zero Ti, Stainless & Chromoly.
Light Action Ti & Stainless

You can interchange bodies and spindles between all pedals listed above. Note: Ti spindles are 2mm shorter. You can use Ward Ti spindles on any of the models listed above.

X5 (aka X3) and Light Action Chromoly are completely different inside and not compatible with the other pedals listed above.

To do a full rebuild requires the following items which can be found at any bearing/hardware supply company:

2 each - HK1010 Needle Bearings. Measurements: OD=14mm BORE=10mm WIDTH=10mm.

2 each - Bearing 136 also known as 686z, 686zz, 686 z, 686 zz. Measurements: OD=13mm BORE=6mm WIDTH=5mm

2 each - Bearing 137 also known as 137z, 137zz, mr137, mr137z, mr137zz, mr 137, mr 137 z, mr 137 zz. Measurements: OD=13mm BORE=7mm WIDTH =4mm

2 each - Inner Retaining Ring BORE=1/2" WIDTH=0.03"

2 each - Rubber O-Ring. ID=5/16" OD=7/16" WIDTH=1/16"

For those of you wanting to lighten up your pedals with aluminum or titanium screws the screw size is:

Bowtie Screws - M4 x 0.7 x 17mm recessed flat head in Stainless Steel. 17mm is the total length of the screw top-to-bottom. 16mm is much easier to find and there should be no problems using the shorter screws for this application. Some flat head screws have a head that is too tall and can protrude from the top of the bowtie. Make sure you get low head screws.

Spindle Screws - M4 x 0.7 x 8mm button head in Furnace Black Steel. 8mm is the length of the threads below the head.

Rebuild instructions:

To replace the bearings unscrew the grease port screw. Using a pick pry off the dust cap. Older pedals will not have the grease port or port screw. Next, remove the spindle screw by using a torx bit or allen wrench (depending on the type of screw) and either a 6mm or 8mm Hex in the Spindle or a 15mm wrench on the Spindle flats (depending on your spindle type).

If, at this point, the screw is stuck do not overtorque it or you will risk stripping out the head. The loctite is seizing the screw. Disclaimer: The following method is not approved by Speedplay and any carelessness can result in injury. You will need to heat the screw to melt the loctite. To do so get a hex bit screw driver and hex bit with the proper torx or allen head for the screw. A hex bit is a small bit the that slides into a quick-change screw driver. Do a Google search for 'hex bit if you don't know or go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Torx_drivers.jpg Place just the hex bit into the screw holding the pedal with the screw straight up. Now with a blow torch or good heat gun heat up the end of the bit (furthest point away from the pedal)until it is red hot making sure you do not heat the pedal body. Wait for about 30 seconds to allow the heat from the bit to transfer into the screw melting the loctite. Then slide the hex bit screw driver onto the bit and unscrew. If heated thoroughly the screw will unscrew with minimal effort.

With the screw removed you can now slide the entire body assembly off. The old o-ring should be on the spindle. Remove and discard. Wipe the spindle clean and set aside. Using a retaining ring tool compress the ring and pull straight out. Now using a punch or screw driver carefully tap out the 2 bearings. Discard the old retaining ring and bearings.

Flip the pedal body around to the side with the needle bearing. On the outside lip of the bearing is a thin wire retaining ring. Most all early models do not have this retaining ring. If your dust cap does not have a grease port screw, it probably does not have the retaining ring. Take a pick and pry up one side of the retaining ring. Then with a pair of pliers pull it out. If it is damaged don't worry. You can usually bend it back and tap it in. If not it is not a 'necessary' piece and you can use your pedals without it. No problem. Flip the pedal over and you will see 2 slots behind the needle bearing. Take a small flat blade screw driver and insert into one of the slots and tap with a rubber mallet. The needle bearing will pop right off. Note that the old bearing will now be damaged and is not re-useable. Wipe the inside clean.

To reassemble first place the new o-ring onto the spindle about 1/3 of the way. Now take the new needle bearing and slide it in as far as you can by hand. Make sure the lettering is on the outside as each side is slightly different. Then carefully tap it with a rubber mallet until it is flush with the pedal body. Take the old needle bearing and place it on the new bearing and tap with a rubber mallet until it is completely seated. Discard the old needle bearing. Take the metal retaining ring and tap it into the slot. Now take the pedal body and slide in the 2 bearings making sure you slide in the thinner bearing first. Make sure the bearings are seated all the way in before installing the retaining ring. The ring should clip into the groove in the pedal body. Take the body assembly and slide it back onto the spindle making sure the o-ring seats properly. Take the spindle screw and dab a little blue loctite onto the threads and screw it in. Do not use green or red loctite as you will not be able to remove the screw in the future. Tighten to 3.5nm torque which is equal to 30in/lb or 2.5ft/lb. Install the dust cap and grease the pedal with a grease gun. Screw in the grease port screw and you're done!! The pedals will feel slightly stiff to start with but will loosen up after a few miles. New or freshly greased pedals may leak grease for the first few rides which is completely normal.


You can get the needle bearings for c. $6.50 from RS online http://au.rs-online.com/web/p/roller-bearings/0513862/ and the other bearings can be found on ebay for under $10 each so it looks like a self service rebuild is a much cheaper option than buying new pedals.

Cheers,
Dave

User avatar
adrian
Posts: 35
Joined: 23 Jun 2010, 11:46
Location: Earlwood, NSW

Postby adrian » 20 Feb 2016, 20:03

Thanks heaps Dave! :D
I've already ordered some bearings on Wiggle and should arrive soon. The info you posted will be invaluable In the future though.
From what I've seen on YouTube the repair job doesn't look too complicated. The instructions will be very handy!
Cheers, Adrian.

demerson
Posts: 42
Joined: 13 Feb 2015, 09:14

Postby demerson » 21 Feb 2016, 17:52

Cool Adrian,

Definity put a post up with how you go as i'm keen to do the same thing.

Cheers,
Dave

User avatar
adrian
Posts: 35
Joined: 23 Jun 2010, 11:46
Location: Earlwood, NSW

Postby adrian » 27 Apr 2016, 20:56

OK...I've dismantled the pedals. This took a bit of time because I stripped the Hex bolt on the end of the spindle on one pedal. I'll need to get new screws...maybe Ti?
I discovered that the bearings in one pedal had a lot of rust and had completely seized up.
I've got brand new bearings and have ordered some Ti spindles...why not?! I doubt the decrease in weight will make me into a Cadel Evans but it's fun to experiment with a little bit of a gratuitous upgrade!
When I get the spindles and screws I'll post another update. So far the rebuild is looking pretty straight forward. Reassembly shouldn't be hard.

User avatar
adrian
Posts: 35
Joined: 23 Jun 2010, 11:46
Location: Earlwood, NSW

Postby adrian » 25 May 2016, 17:35

It's taken a while to complete this project but I've finished it at last.

For anyone who might do an overhaul of your Speedplay pedals in the future, here's what I learned.

Be really careful when you are removing the hex nuts from the spindles. I stripped one of them and thought I would never be able to unscrew it. The solution was to use a torx bit to remove the hex nut. This really saved me from a lot of wailing and gnashing of teeth.

A soldering iron can be used to heat up the nut to melt the blue loctite in the thread of the hex nut.

Dave's links on dismantling the pedals and sourcing bearings proved to be invaluable. Thanks, Dave! :D

Removing the old needle bearings proved to be quite a challenge because I initially couldn't get the metal retaining rings out. (What Speedplay says about the needle bearings being bonded to the pedal body and not to remove them is a load of old cobblers. They probably just want you to shell out $$$ on new pedals).
My solution was to file away a very small amount of the plastic of the pedal body to expose the retaining ring. I was then able to use a small screw driver to lever the ring out.

I reused all of the original retaining rings and screws as none was damaged.

My Speedplay Zeros had chromoly spindles which I changed for titanium spindles sourced on eBay for $54.
They're nice and light now and will no doubt give me that increase in performance that I've been looking for...if not I can blame my general lack of fitness!

In summary, rebuilding your pedals yourself is really worthwhile. I saved a lot of money and learned lots in the process.


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