Tools

Bicycle related chatter & discussion
orphic
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Postby orphic » 31 Jan 2011, 10:52

So, I've decided it's about time I invest in some tools.

I'm putting a bike together at the moment and a big aim for me this year is to get to the point where I can service, rebuild and generally just take really good care of my bicycles all by myself. With all the adventuring I want to do it makes sense that I should be able to do these things so I can fix my bikes in the middle of nowhere.

Kind of after some advice on what I need initially and what's good quality but at a decent price. I figure that I would like to buy nice things as it would be nice if they last forever.

Thinking at the moment I need

- Torq wrench
- Good set of allen keys (I have a set but nice ones with with proper handles would be awesome)
- Pedal spanner
- Chain whip
- Lock ring tool

As for BB tools, I know they vary so I don't really know what to get there. Also thinking a work stand might be a worthwhile investment.

Appreciate the ideas/advice :)

christian
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Postby christian » 31 Jan 2011, 11:04

Have you got a new bike? New road bike perhaps?

Unfortunately good quality tools cost a lot of money. There are some cheaper manufacturers such as BBB and Icetools. Pedros are also good, you may not want to go as far as Park as they tend to be quite pricey. The torque wrench is a handy addition, you'll realise that you have been doing everything up way to tight.

You are likely to need two chain whips, a 1/8 for track and a 3/32 one for geared bikes. You can get track tools that have a whip on one end and a lock ring spanner on the other.

Other tools that come in handy are cassette tools, you can get ones you use when touring as well. Most bikes now use the same BB tool for external bearings, the internal spline tool you just borrow off someone if you ever need one. Cone spanners are also handy for adjusting hubs, you can buy a set that will cover most of the common sizes.

There is lots more, the list just keeps going on.

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weiyun
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Postby weiyun » 31 Jan 2011, 12:42

Bunning can be your friend. A set of solid hex spanners can last forever. For bike specific tools, Park Tools are always solid and relatively on budget. There are others but judge individually.

Best to just buy as needed unless you want the gratification of having "almost everything and many useless" at an instant ie. Mail order a tool kit.

One piece of advice based on my personal experience. Forget about those hand cable cutter. Buy a Dremel tool instead. Those hand cable cutters will never cut the cable outer straight although it'll do a decent job on the cable. But a Dremel will do both properly along with many many other uses on the bike and in the house. You can even use it to wax polish your bike! ;)


Hung
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Postby Hung » 31 Jan 2011, 13:21


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mikesbytes
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Postby mikesbytes » 31 Jan 2011, 15:09

What I've got

- Torq wrench
BBB. It works really well. From what I've seen there is a standard set that gets sold under a number of brands

- Good set of allen keys (I have a set but nice ones with with proper handles would be awesome)
I have a set with the handles that I brought at a $2 style shop and they work really well. Well worth purchasing.

- Pedal spanner
These are fairly thin, I suggest purchasing a good quality one. However you can usually just use the big allen key above. Many pedals have a wide enough spanner surface that you can use an open ended fixie spanner and they are heaps stronger than a pedal spanner

- Chain whip
Get Ron to make you one, the one he made for Mark L is brilliant, it puts your hand outside the wheel

- Lock ring tool
I hate my BBB lock ring tool, but perhaps I hate all lock ring tools

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Toff
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Postby Toff » 31 Jan 2011, 16:54

I've seen some bike toolkits for sale at the usual places, like PBK and T7, but the problem with buying a toolkit like that is that all the parts are usually for your lowest common denominator Shimano components. That makes half the tools wrong for someone who uses Campag or probably SRAM, and so you still need to go out and get half the tools again.

I have bought the tools I need individually, over a number of years, and most are high quality tools designed to last me many years, rather than el cheapo tools. One of the first things I bought was a toolcase so that my tools can go everywhere with me, and so I don't lose them. I can now bring all my tools down to the track, so I can work on my bike anywhere...

You should really get a work stand too. They really help to get the bike up where you can see what you're doing. Not cheap though, but for regular work, nothing beats having one.

For me, essential tools have been cone spanners, a chain breaker, needle nose pliers, and circlip removers. I have a sharp set of wire cutters, which works perfectly for me. My tool has no problems cutting through brake cable, but I can understand how a cheap tool will struggle to do a good job. Never used a Dremel so I can't comment. I don't use a pedal spanner. Instead I use my 15mm track nut spanner. It's thicker than a pedal spanner, and doesn't leave tool marks. It was hard to find a good lock ring tool, but I have one now, and whilst I almost never use it, you have to have one to remove old bottom brackets...

I have never needed a road chain whip. I only ever use my track 1/8th inch one, which is placed over the last cog when removing road cassettes.

rhys
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Postby rhys » 02 Feb 2011, 16:37

Loctite is a good thing to have too.

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geoffs
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Postby geoffs » 02 Feb 2011, 20:22

I'll second the homemade chain whip. A friend made me one over 15 years ago and it's still going strong.
Loctite 222
one of these if you are touring http://www.spacycles.co.uk/products.php ... 2b0s72p595. i have a stein mini tool that i tour with. have a look at http://pardo.net/bike/pic/fail-029/index.html and make your own
a park bbt-9 bottom bracket tool
Park PH1 allen wrenches
spokey red nipple key
cable cutters - we just bought a good pair for work from ? and it has a spike for opening up the cable end. smart design
I want one of these http://www.wiggle.co.uk/au/pedros-tulio ... ol-skewer/
A good heavy rubber mallet
A good torque wrench is a must if you are taking handlebars of and on. Have seen a couple of stem bar clamps fracture from over enthusiastic tightening

rhys
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Postby rhys » 02 Feb 2011, 21:22

It's so much easier when you only have a bmx. A hammer, a piece of wood, and some allen keys are all you need. Why oh why did I ever start riding big wheels.

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weiyun
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Postby weiyun » 02 Feb 2011, 21:34


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mikesbytes
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Postby mikesbytes » 02 Feb 2011, 22:00


timyone
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Postby timyone » 02 Feb 2011, 22:01

i seriously keep opening this thread expecting it to be a list of peoples names!

orphic
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Postby orphic » 03 Feb 2011, 09:36

Hehe Tim, I was waiting for a crack like that...

Thanks heaps for the advice everyone! Just got to start sourcing the bits and pieces now.

Oh and regarding new bike, no it's not a roadie. I can't afford to upgrade that just yet. I bought a second hand (done about 50km) On-One Inbred 29er frame (sliding drops) that will become my NZ touring and single speed nationals racing bike for Easter :)

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Toff
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Postby Toff » 03 Feb 2011, 11:41

I'm not so sure about that Pedros tool. Could be a pain in the neck if you were trying to adjust something that requires the wheel to be affixed, like brake pads, for example. A good heavy mallet made of a softish rubber compound is a great tool, and one I forgot. It's one of my most oft-used tools.

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marc2131
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Postby marc2131 » 03 Apr 2017, 08:53

I've been putting off getting a proper cable cutter for a while now. Been looking on Wiggle and CRC and it is not clear if these same cutters can crimp a ferrule to the cable end.
Any recommendations and how much do I need to spend?

jcaley
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Postby jcaley » 03 Apr 2017, 10:18

The pair I bought are cheap and effective - they just cut


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