Mid Life Crisis Bike

Bicycle related chatter & discussion
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Dougie
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Postby Dougie » 08 Aug 2011, 15:33

I was discussing the virtues of our marital bliss with the bride on the weekend. We accompanied this fulsome exchange with the appropriate gestures to give emphasis to various points made throughout the generally one way conversation. It dawned on me that at 42 years and six months of age I have probably tipped over the halfway mark of my existence on the Planet (I do not share your eternal life thing as I simply couldn’t bear anymore bliss than I am already fortunate enough to have).

With this in mind I figured having a midlife crisis might be a worthwhile experience to tick off on the bucket list. After Googling the affliction I took great comfort in noting that it’s manifestation looked really fun. I note the following:

• Abuse of Alcohol
• Acquisition of unusual or expensive items such as motorbikes, boats, clothing, sports cars, jewelry, gadgets, tattoos, piercings, etc.
• Pretend acquisition of expensive items via non-authentic materials or automobile badge replacement
• depression
• Blaming themselves for their failures
• Paying special attention to physical appearance such as covering baldness, wearing youthful designer clothes, etc.
• Entering relationships with younger people (either/or sexual, professional, parental, etc.)
• Placing over importance (and possibly a psychologically damaging amount) on their children to excel in areas such as sports, arts, or academics

So, I don’t mind a cold beer on a hot day, Tick. Blaming myself for my failures, the bride also enjoys blaming me for my failures, Tick. Paying attention to physical appearance, I am keen to see my toes again without the use of an angled mirror, and am considering a pony tail, Tick. Depression, Tick. Relationships with younger people, hmmmm girlfriends of married men require time and money and I don’t have either, Cross. Having children excel, my eight year old has an hour of Rugby followed by an hour or swimming squad, Tiger Dad, Tick. And the kicker. Acquisition of expensive items! I want a new bike.

I love my aluminium Trek 1.7. I do, really. I just covert my neighbours bike. I want carbon. I want weightlessness. I want Aero Wheels. I want to beat the Lunch Bunch to the coffee shop.

I am considering offerings from Cervelo and Specialized. Bear in mind my bike shop is in Gymea and once you have a bike shop you have it for life…. So I am open to anything else Endeavour Cycles sells. I have the flexibility of a plank, hence Cervelo R3 or Specialized Roubaix seem to fit the bill. Open to wheels and groupsets. Build it and they will come.

Any thoughts before I present the budget to the Office of State Revenue for parliamentary oversight?

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jermxx
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Postby jermxx » 08 Aug 2011, 15:49

I really like my R3. You're welcome to have a little play if you fit a 54cm frame...

Richard
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Postby Richard » 08 Aug 2011, 16:00

I ride a Roubaix 07. It has a longer headtube than many other road bikes.

Its been a good bike but when I bought it a few years back there were fewer options in this style of bike. Nowadays most of the brands have a grandpa model

Cannondale Synapse
Specialized Roubaix
Giant Defy
Cervelo R??
Scott CR1

Then there is always the option of a custom frame.

othy
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Postby othy » 08 Aug 2011, 16:12

Colnago C59...

Baum...

Parlee ( I may be biased here)..

wallman
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Postby wallman » 08 Aug 2011, 16:49

For a mid-life crisis you can't really go past

Campagnolo Boras, Super Record and to really appeal to their market it's too light to race and sports a compact crankset so it's too slow to race as well.

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fenn_paddler
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Postby fenn_paddler » 08 Aug 2011, 18:37

Don't knock compact cranks! There are pros that race/have raced on them.

I would wait a little while until more bikes with ultegra di2 become available. Or depending on budget go dura ace electronic shifting...

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weiyun
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Postby weiyun » 08 Aug 2011, 18:40


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Stuart
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Postby Stuart » 08 Aug 2011, 18:48

Endeavour Cycles also sells Pinarello (it's where I bought mine) but they're not really "easy riding"

I'd buy

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JoTheBuilder
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Postby JoTheBuilder » 08 Aug 2011, 19:06

I was not much of a rider until I bought my Avanti Questa 2.0. It's amazing, I love it, and would definitely recommend it (I bought it over the Roubaix).

Apologies if Endeavour Cycles does not stock Avanti.

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mikesbytes
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Postby mikesbytes » 08 Aug 2011, 19:51

Fixie

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Postby shrubb face » 08 Aug 2011, 21:08


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weiyun
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Postby weiyun » 08 Aug 2011, 21:38


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Eleri
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Postby Eleri » 08 Aug 2011, 22:01


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weiyun
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Postby weiyun » 08 Aug 2011, 22:04


shrubb face
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Postby shrubb face » 08 Aug 2011, 22:07

To only answer your direct question, yes. I'm an amateur club rider and I sprint on 53/11 regularly. :)

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mikesbytes
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Postby mikesbytes » 08 Aug 2011, 22:08

Of course this thread is about Mid Life Crisis, so its got little to do with what is best for us, just head to pie in the sky and admire the 200kph+ motorbikes being ridden at 60kph. But if Casey Stoner can win the world championship on it, then it must be perfect for riding at 60kph

Now as we know the most important part of the bike is the nut behind the handlebars, but should that nut be driving a std or compact.

First lets look at the impact of gearing
50/11 at 60km/h cadence of 105
53/11 at 60km/h cadence of 99

But if Mark Cavendish can do 74kph, then just like Casey Stoner, one needs to consider the need for equipment that is suitable for that speed
74km/h 53/11 -> 116
74km/h 50/11 -> 123

Wait we are talking mid life crisis, there's two practicable issues with these oldies;
1. can't spin like a youngie
2. don't put out power like a youngie
So 1 says std 53 and 2 says compact 50

But lets get back to the real issue, what's going to look best when the bike is parked at the coffee shop and that my friends is 55t TT ring, all beautifully clean as you did the entire ride on the 42 [39 is for wimps]

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Eleri
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Postby Eleri » 08 Aug 2011, 22:22

Gentlemen

This thread is being derailed.

Dougie you might read this humorous but satirical view on cyclo-philanthropism and the $15K bicycle.


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mikesbytes
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Postby mikesbytes » 08 Aug 2011, 22:28


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jimmy
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Postby jimmy » 09 Aug 2011, 08:20

Back on topic.

There are several things to consider, do you want an off the shelf bike? Or do you want to buy it in bits and pieces? Typically an off the shelf will be cheaper, but a bitsa allows you to pretty much customise everything. Not all frames are available as a separate purchase, so it does rule out some choices. It does mean that you can run you preferred groupset on a frame that doesn't normally come with that groupset. The same is true for wheels.

Personally, whenever you spend more than about $5,000 on a bike, you'll get a good bike. The only thing that may make the different is the various geometry between them. You may want to consider a trip to Steve Hogg first, as he will be able to advise you on which brand's geometry works best for you.

But of course, we're all missing the obvious part of picking a new bike. How good does it look. If it doesn't look good, why buy it?

James

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weiyun
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Postby weiyun » 09 Aug 2011, 08:42


patn
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Postby patn » 09 Aug 2011, 12:55

My local bike shop just got in on of these . That'd look really sexy parked outside your cafe.

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fenn_paddler
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Postby fenn_paddler » 09 Aug 2011, 13:49

Cheap ebay carbon frame not recommended:

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Postby timyone » 09 Aug 2011, 14:26

First note, beating the lunch bunch too the cafe will probably not be overly related to your bike. When I upgraded from my touring bike with low gears to my bmc, it made a massive diff in the sprint, and on corners at heffron, but going better at waterfall could have to do with more training, or better training. But yeah.

Which bike looks the best? Go for that :)

In saying that, I jumped on a pinerello at heffron that was owned by a lad that works for the importer, and that thing felt amazing! Training wheels, but amazing!

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Postby jimmy » 10 Aug 2011, 07:48


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Postby fenn_paddler » 10 Aug 2011, 09:20


krankee1
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Postby krankee1 » 10 Aug 2011, 09:53

Who would this bloke sue if he wound up in a wheelchair. Same mould is a complete crock, a chinese company making a cheap copy , who would have thought?

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Dougie
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Postby Dougie » 10 Aug 2011, 10:31

I thought I would encapsulate the recommendations so far as everyone has been tremendously helpful. The bikes/frames to be considered are as followed.

Cervelo R3, Cannondale Synapse, Specialized Roubaix, Giant Defy, Cervelo R??, Scott CR1, Colnago C59, Baum, Parlee, A really expensive Wilier, Pinarello, Avanti Questa 2.0, Fixie, A $15,000 Tri Bike with Zipps for all occasions, A custom frame, MCipollini, Not a cheap ebay Chinese Carbon Frame, A cheap ebay Carbon Carbon Frame, A cheap ebay Chinese Aluminium Frame, BMC, A Wheelchair.

An additional consideration is to buy a complete bike, then pull it apart and if I am smart I can sell the bits to someone else and then buy some more bits and put it back together again.

So this has really narrowed the choice down nicely from the sublime to the ridiculous.

I should also visit Steve Hogg. Do I take flowers, chocolates, coffee or an old saddle as a hostess gift?

A heated debate around my ring size (reminds me to the time I worked in Darlinghurst and I wandered into the Tool Shed under the mistaken impression that I could have got a screwdriver. Really, it could happen to anyone).

I am flattered that Thor Hushovd and Mark Cavendish are being mentioned when discussing what gearing ratios I should consider. That I should also take into account said gearing ratio for descents approaching 100kph. Can I tell you just quietly. The ONLY time I am descending at 100kph is when I am in air conditioned comfort, safely surrounded by steel. The protective properties of lycra are soooo over rated.

Any more suggestions anyone?

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Postby orphic » 10 Aug 2011, 10:51

As I just bought a new road bike recently, some of the consideration I deem to be important are fresh in my mind.

The first decision for me was a geometry based one. Do I need a racey geometry (typically defined by shorter head tube) or a more relaxed one? For the type of riding I do and for the fact that I am a short arse, a racey geometry was required so I can get the bars low enough to have a respectable saddle to bar drop – although it’s still not much (due to being a short arse and having little exposted seat post). I see A LOT of guys out there on bikes that have head tubes that are too short for their build and they can’t get the bars high enough. This is especially important if you are carrying some load on your frontal energy storage unit or simply lack some glute flexibility. The former will see the knees coming too close to said storage unit, and the latter will mean that power at the top of the stroke is.. well, crap! This is where Steve Hogg can certainly come in handy and eliminate your concerns – along with a plethora of other areas relating to bike fit.

The second was the frame material. No brainer for me – I wanted carbon.

The third was brand/looks. This was governed by what is available to me at the LBS I’m supported by.

The fourth was groupset… It came down to a decision between DA, DI2 and SRAM Red for me. I was upgrading from an Ultegra based gruppo. I thought long and hard on this and was very tempted to go Di2 but I am glad I went with Red.

The final concern was cost and the practicality of it. Ultimately it was cost that had me chosing Red over Di2. Doesn’t matter how cheap you can get the bike for, the fact is that I would not feel comfortable owning a bike that was worth $10k. There’s a whole heap of things I want to do with that bike (ride in the rain on ocassion, lock it up at work) that I wouldn’t be cool with doing to a Di2 equipped bike!

My outcome was a Cannondale Supersix with SRAM Red. And it rules. My quarter life crisis bike ;)

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Postby weiyun » 10 Aug 2011, 13:40


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Timbo
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Postby Timbo » 10 Aug 2011, 15:05

My only advice would be that steel is real.

I bought a lightweight steel frame (Colnago Master) and couldn't be happier. The ride is supple but precise. The geometry is aggressive. It's an absolute joy to ride, especially over long distances.

It may be heavier that carbon frames (the Master weighs in at about 1.7kg) and is certainly a bit heavier than my Trek 2200 aluminium/carbon bike, but I race regularly on it and seem to be able to mix it with the best of them.

If I was looking for a steel bike right now I'd have to consider a custom made Baum with Reynolds or Columbus stainless steel, which is far more resistant to corrosion (not that rust is that much to worry about if you use a frame saver product to spray inside the frame and fork). Cinelli also do a stainless frame (they sell it through Rapha), as does Tommasini (the X-Fire). These are not cheap however (and I've seen the Master online for about $2,500 which is an awesome price).

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Postby Richard » 10 Aug 2011, 21:33

The ultimate mid-life crisis bike would have to be a titanium tandem.

What better way to enjoy your mid life crisis than to ride off into the distance with a gorgeous lycra clad lass!!!

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Trouty
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Postby Trouty » 11 Aug 2011, 20:19

Last edited by Trouty on 12 Aug 2011, 06:45, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby mikesbytes » 11 Aug 2011, 20:27


Richard
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Postby Richard » 11 Aug 2011, 20:55

Good point Jo

Alternatively

If you wanted to have your cake and eat it to you could always get a triple seated bike like the old 'Goodies' show

One seat for you, one for your other half and one seat for the mistress

All bases covered

On second thought a hotel room would be easier and cheaper. I think that the thread is getting derailed again

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mikesbytes
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Postby mikesbytes » 11 Aug 2011, 20:59

How can you derail a thread called "Mid Life Crisis Bike" ?

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Trouty
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Postby Trouty » 12 Aug 2011, 06:49


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Postby jimmy » 12 Aug 2011, 07:19

A Lawyer, Doctor and a Cyclist are discussing the various merits of having a wife or a mistress.

The Lawyer states that it's best to have a mistress, as there are no legal consequences if things go sour.

The Doctor states that it's best to have a wife, because of the stability and the health benefits associated with that.

The Cyclist states that it's best to have both. The Doctor and Lawyer look confused for a bit, and the Cyclist elaborates. Because, the wife thinks you're with you're mistress, and the mistress thinks you're with you're wife, you can go for a really long bike ride!

James

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Dougie
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Postby Dougie » 12 Aug 2011, 11:42

Boom tish, thangu vrry march. Ahmm here all week....

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Postby rhys » 17 Aug 2011, 01:17

This thread has kept me entertained on my overnight shift, bravo.

I'm fortunate enough to have experienced a mid-life crisis already, so I'm here to help. When it comes to buying bikes, I find there is a simple formula - work out your budget, and then double it.
I would suggest something made of titanium as its light yet forgiving. Good for old bones. The longer headtube is also a good idea. I love one of my bikes that has a 5 inch saddle to bar drop, but could I ride it all day? No thanks. Comfort is a major factor, as it will make you want to ride it again and again.
Looks are also key if you want to impress and be proud, and again ride it lots and lots. This is personal preference so you can really only be guided so much.
In summary, I would suggest:
Long head tube, ti/carbon, looks hot. Easy.
If I had $15k I'd buy another Look in a second.

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mikesbytes
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Postby mikesbytes » 17 Aug 2011, 09:46

Nah your old bones want something with lots of chatter. Helps build bone density

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JM
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Postby JM » 17 Aug 2011, 10:51

Hi Dougie,

My suggestion for some inspiration is read Robert Penn "It's all about the bike" great book about a cyclist getting his ultimate bike.

I hope to reveal my mid life crisis bike sometime next year.

James

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Dougie
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Postby Dougie » 17 Aug 2011, 13:15

OK so the budget has been approved. Or at least that's what I understand "Darling, you are welcome to spend $8,000 on a new bike. You may also wish to sleep with one eye open. In the spare room" means on the approval scale.

Two bike shops are under consideration. 1 Endeavour Cycles. They have history easing money from my wallet. 2 Orange County Choppers. They seem to fit the bill when it comes to head tube height, comfort, looks, ease of getting up hills and creating middle life crisis bikes (there's a section on leathers but nothing on lycras, odd huh?).

I will keep you updated with my marital status

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geoffs
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Postby geoffs » 20 Aug 2011, 06:00

I'd be getting a ti bike myself as my thoughts are that if you are going to spend serious money then you want someting that will last.
I'd also strongly recommend seeing steve hogg. You dont have to take my word for it as i work there and am totally biased, ask around and you'll find quiet a few that have been to see him. For more info read his blogg at www.stevehoggbikefitting.com
Darren baum was there yesterday for a bikefit.
Have look at Marian's seven if you want to see what a craftsman built frame looks like.

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Trouty
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Postby Trouty » 20 Aug 2011, 09:28


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Stuart
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Postby Stuart » 20 Aug 2011, 13:36

Yeah, I'd go the Ti Seven custom built but the frame is around $6-7k - doesn't leave much change from the $8 budget!

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weiyun
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Postby weiyun » 20 Aug 2011, 15:50


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geoffs
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Postby geoffs » 20 Aug 2011, 23:05

Not quite that much for a Seven.
I think the Axiom starts at about $4,800 USD. Still not cheap though

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Stuart
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Postby Stuart » 21 Aug 2011, 15:51

well, this year, I think I'll get my old-age crisis bike >> - except in red.


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